The Holiness of God

Who is like you, majestic in holiness? Exodus 15:11

This verse is one of the loftiest descriptions of the majesty of God in the
whole of Scripture. The holiness of God is his glory and crown. It is the
blessedness of his nature. It renders him glorious in himself, and glorious
to his creatures. ‘Holy’ is more fixed as an epithet to his name than any
other. This is his greatest title of honour. He is pure and unmixed light,
free from all blemish in his essence, nature, and operations. He cannot be
deformed by any evil. The notion of God cannot be entertained without separating
from him whatever is impure and staining. Though he is majestic, eternal,
almighty, wise, immutable, merciful, and whatsoever other perfections may
dignify so sovereign a being, yet if we conceive him destitute of this
excellent perfection, and imagine him possessed with the least contagion of
evil, we make him but an infinite monster, and sully all those perfections
we ascribed to him before. It is a contradiction for him to be God and to
have any darkness mixed with his light. To deny his purity, makes him no
God. He that says God is not holy, speaks much worse than if he said there
is no God at all. Where do we read of the angels crying out Eternal or
Faithful Lord God of hosts? But we do hear them singing Holy, Holy, Holy.
God swears by his holiness (Psa. 89: 35). His holiness is a pledge for the
assurance of his promises. Power is his hand, omniscience his eye, mercy
his heart, eternity his duration, but holiness his beauty. It renders him
lovely and gives beauty to all his attributes. Every action of his is free
from all hints of evil. Holiness is the crown of all his attributes, the
life of all his decrees, and the brightness of all his actions. Nothing is
decreed by him and nothing is acted by him that is not consistent with the
beauty of his holiness.

– STEPHEN CHARNOCK, The Existence & Attributes of God, pp. 446-452

Richard Rushing. Voices from the Past (Kindle Locations 3969-3982). The Banner
of Truth Trust.

Today’s Devotion

Meditation for This Evening by C. H. Spurgeon
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“I sleep, but my heart waketh.”–Song of Solomon 5:2.

PARADOXES abound in Christian experience, and here is one–the spouse was asleep, and yet she was awake. He only can read the believer’s riddle who has ploughed with the heifer of his experience. The two points in this evening’s text are–a mournful sleepiness and a hopeful wakefulness. I sleep. Through sin that dwelleth in us we may become lax in holy duties, slothful in religious exercises, dull in spiritual joys, and altogether supine and careless. This is a shameful state for one in whom the quickening Spirit dwells; and it is dangerous to the highest degree. Even wise virgins sometimes slumber, but it is high time for all to shake off the bands of sloth. It is to be feared that many believers lose their strength as Samson lost his locks, while sleeping on the lap of carnal security. With a perishing world around us, to sleep is cruel; with eternity so near at hand, it is madness. Yet we are none of us so much awake as we should be; a few thunder-claps would do us all good, and it may be, unless we soon bestir ourselves, we shall have them in the form of war, or pestilence, or personal bereavements and losses. O that we may leave for ever the couch of fleshly ease, and go forth with flaming torches to meet the coming Bridegroom! My heart waketh. This is a happy sign. Life is not extinct, though sadly smothered. When our renewed heart struggles against our natural heaviness, we should be grateful to sovereign grace for keeping a little vitality within the body of this death. Jesus will hear our hearts, will help our hearts, will visit our hearts; for the voice of the wakeful heart is really the voice of our Beloved, saying, “Open to me.” Holy zeal will surely unbar the door.

“Oh lovely attitude! He stands

With melting heart and laden hands;

My soul forsakes her every sin;

And lets the heavenly stranger in.”

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Charles H. Spurgeon, Morning and Evening
www.spurgeon.org/morn_eve/this_evening.cgi

Today’s Devotion

Meditation for This Evening by C. H. Spurgeon
——–
“Jesus said unto him, If thou canst believe.”–Mark 9:23.

A certain man had a demoniac son, who was afflicted with a dumb spirit. The father, having seen the futility of the endeavours of the disciples to heal his child, had little or no faith in Christ, and therefore, when he was bidden to bring his son to Him, he said to Jesus, “If Thou cast do anything, have compassion on us, and help us.” Now there was an “if” in the question, but the poor trembling father had put the “if” in the wrong place: Jesus Christ, therefore, without commanding him to retract the “if,” kindly puts it in its legitimate position. “Nay, verily,” He seemed to say, “there should be no ‘if’ about My power, nor concerning My willingness, the ‘if’ lies somewhere else.” “If thou canst believe, all things are possible to him that believeth.” The man’s trust was strengthened, he offered a humble prayer for an increase of faith, and instantly Jesus spoke the word, and the devil was cast out, with an injunction never to return. There is a lesson here which we need to learn. We, like this man, often see that there is an “if” somewhere, but we are perpetually blundering by putting it in the wrong place. “If” Jesus can help me–“if” He can give me grace to overcome temptation–“if” He can give me pardon–“if” He can make me successful? Nay, “if” you can believe, He both can and will. You have misplaced your “if.” If you can confidently trust, even as all things are possible to Christ, so shall all things be possible to you. Faith standeth in God’s power, and is robed in God’s majesty; it weareth the royal apparel, and rideth on the King’s horse, for it is the grace which the King delighteth to honour. Girding itself with the glorious might of the all-working Spirit, it becomes, in the omnipotence of God, mighty to do, to dare, and to suffer. All things, without limit, are possible to him that believeth. My soul, canst thou believe thy Lord to-night?

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Charles H. Spurgeon, Morning and Evening
www.spurgeon.org/morn_eve/this_evening.cgi