Self Dedication

ENTER, Jesus, fill my Heart
With nothing else but Thee
Now thy saving Pow’r exert,
And more than conquer Me :
Each intruding Eival kill
That hinders or obstructs thy Eeign ;
All thy glorious Might reveal,
And make me pure within.

Through my Soul in Mercy shine,
Thine Holy Spirit give ;
Let Him mtness. Lord, with mine
That I in Jesus live
Set me free from Satan’s Load,
The Gift of Liberty dispense :
In my Heart shed abroad
Thy quick’ning Influence.

O that not a future Word,
Or Act, or Thought of mine
flight offend my gracious Loed,
Or quench the Light divine !
Take me. Saviour, as I am,
Self-will’d, unholy and unclean :
Stamp thy Likeness, write thy Name
Indelibly within.

Lose the Gifts bestow’d on me
To thy great Praise alone ;
Loed, the Talents lent by thee
Are thine and not my own :
May I in thy Service spend
All the Graces thou hast giv’n,
Taken up, when Time shall end,
To Live and Eeim in Heav’n.

– Augustus Toplady, Poems and Hymns

I will meditate in thy precepts. Psalm 119:15

I will meditate in thy precepts.
Psalm 119:15
There are times when solitude is better than society, and silence is wiser than speech. We should be better Christians if we were more alone, waiting upon God, and gathering through meditation on his Word spiritual strength for labour in his service. We ought to muse upon the things of God, because we thus get the real nutriment out of them. Truth is something like the cluster of the vine: if we would have wine from it, we must bruise it; we must press and squeeze it many times. The bruiser’s feet must come down joyfully upon the bunches, or else the juice will not flow; and they must well tread the grapes, or else much of the precious liquid will be wasted. So we must, by meditation, tread the clusters of truth, if we would get the wine of consolation therefrom. Our bodies are not supported by merely taking food into the mouth, but the process which really supplies the muscle, and the nerve, and the sinew, and the bone, is the process of digestion. It is by digestion that th
e outward food becomes assimilated with the inner life. Our souls are not nourished merely by listening awhile to this, and then to that, and then to the other part of divine truth. Hearing, reading, marking, and learning, all require inwardly digesting to complete their usefulness, and the inward digesting of the truth lies for the most part in meditating upon it. Why is it that some Christians, although they hear many sermons, make but slow advances in the divine life? Because they neglect their closets, and do not thoughtfully meditate on God’s Word. They love the wheat, but they do not grind it; they would have the corn, but they will not go forth into the fields to gather it; the fruit hangs upon the tree, but they will not pluck it; the water flows at their feet, but they will not stoop to drink it. From such folly deliver us, O Lord, and be this our resolve this morning, “I will meditate in thy precepts.”

Let us lift up our heart with our hands unto God in the heavens. Lamentations 3:41

Let us lift up our heart with our hands unto God in the heavens.
Lamentations 3:41
The act of prayer teaches us our unworthiness, which is a very salutary lesson for such proud beings as we are. If God gave us favours without constraining us to pray for them we should never know how poor we are, but a true prayer is an inventory of wants, a catalogue of necessities, a revelation of hidden poverty. While it is an application to divine wealth, it is a confession of human emptiness. The most healthy state of a Christian is to be always empty in self and constantly depending upon the Lord for supplies; to be always poor in self and rich in Jesus; weak as water personally, but mighty through God to do great exploits; and hence the use of prayer, because, while it adores God, it lays the creature where it should be, in the very dust. Prayer is in itself, apart from the answer which it brings, a great benefit to the Christian. As the runner gains strength for the race by daily exercise, so for the great race of life we acquire energy by the hallowed labour of pray
er. Prayer plumes the wings of God’s young eaglets, that they may learn to mount above the clouds. Prayer girds the loins of God’s warriors, and sends them forth to combat with their sinews braced and their muscles firm. An earnest pleader cometh out of his closet, even as the sun ariseth from the chambers of the east, rejoicing like a strong man to run his race. Prayer is that uplifted hand of Moses which routs the Amalekites more than the sword of Joshua; it is the arrow shot from the chamber of the prophet foreboding defeat to the Syrians. Prayer girds human weakness with divine strength, turns human folly into heavenly wisdom, and gives to troubled mortals the peace of God. We know not what prayer cannot do! We thank thee, great God, for the mercy-seat, a choice proof of thy marvellous lovingkindness. Help us to use it aright throughout this day!